How to List Your Local Business Online

If you are operating a business in your local area, you would want it’s popularity to rise so that you can work towards gaining more and more reputation and customers from your area, so that you can beat the competition. You can use several ways to make sure that you are on the top in your local area; one of the ways could be advertising. You need to learn how to list your local business online because it’s a medium that will be around for a long time and it is growing rapidly today.

In this article, I plan on telling you about the various methods of advertising you could use, as well as methods to list your local business online.

If you are operation a local business, I am pretty sure that your advertising budget will be really small, and you would look to find out the methods by which you can advertise without going over your limits. You would also want your advertisement to be effective in the sense that it would reach out to all of your targeted consumers. Well, the first method you could use is by advertising in newspapers.

Printing ads in the newspapers can be relatively easy and cheap. You would just have to go at the newspaper agency and give them the details of the advertisement that you want to place in their newspaper. Another option that you could utilize would be through the flyers. However, you should take care with them because if their circulation is not in the right area, you wouldn’t benefit from them at all.

You could also benefit from the yellow pages directory in this regard, but the thing is that not many people pay attention to yellow pages or the newspaper ads or the flyers these days. More and more people are now spending time online, which gives you even more of a reason to start listing your local business online and getting the potential customer leads from there. In this way, you would be spending less amount of money on the advertisements and will gain more because the internet has a lot of target public.

The internet can be the most affordable deal for you, and also the most wisest choice, which is due to the fact that a lot of people, about 78% in total, search on the internet for the products or services that they want to acquire, and they would go around buying from the dealer available nearest from their house. In this way, if you list your local business online, you would get a lot of hits per day because there would be a lot of people in your area that don’t even know that you are running this local business, and just because they searched on the internet for it, they would come to you and buy the stuff that you are selling.

You don’t need your website to be real colorful or anything. Just put on a simple website, and make sure that you apply SEO or Search Engine Optimization on it, so that your website appears on the top of the list among the others in your competition.

9 Fantastic Tips to Help You Buy Great Christmas Presents Without Overspending

It is easy to spend over your budget at Christmas time. Whether you are spending money on presents or luxurious foods to consume, this is the time of year that we usually indulge ourselves. A little overspending is harmless, as long as it is managed well, but many people spend what they cannot afford, leading them into financial difficulty. Others cause themselves extra stress by leaving present buying to the last minute. This generally always leads to bad decision making and is the main reason for overspending choice of gift becomes more limited as we approach Christmas.

Here are some of my handy tips that will help you avoid both stress and overspending. I hope you enjoy them and please share your tips with me by commenting!

  1. I usually work out what I have to spend on gifts in November. I factor everything into my budget; what I will be spending on socialising, on the day itself and then work out what I have left (after the usual every day living costs). Knowing this figure is half of the battle because once you know this, you instantly become more aware of the cost of an individual present compared to the overall budget.
  2. Write a list of everyone that I have to buy gifts for, noting down any present ideas as I go.
  3. I divide the budget by how many people I have on my list and then allocate different amounts to the different people on the list depending on how important they are to me.
  4. I also write a deadline date down on my list for doing all online shopping and finishing off in the shops. I do this because I had an undelivered item a few years ago.
  5. I go online and look for discount vouchers and special deals that I can use to get more for my money. When I have done this I start immediately shopping online, making sure to tick off anyone on my list that I manage to find a gift for.
  6. I get my diary out and plan a few shopping trips. Before I go on these trips I always plan where I need to go so that I can make the most of my trip and once I am at my shopping destination I ‘check in’ to any shops that I am interested in using my smart phone and Facebook – this is an excellent way of getting special deals that are not available on the rest of the internet.
  7. If I have a few people on the list that would like to receive cosmetics or bathing products, I often try and look for 3 for 2 offers in places like Boots or the Bodyshop.
  8. I mark down what I have spent everytime I buy a present so that I can keep an eye on the rolling total.

How To Negotiate Your Salary and Get Paid What You Are Worth

Salary Negotiations Tip #1: Know your value and be able to clearly articulate the returns that an employer can expect from hiring you. Never forget that as an employee you are investment. When a company hires you, they are making a financial investment through the compensation and benefits that they provide you (as well as many other expenses involved in hiring), and they are doing so with the expectation that their returns on that investment (ROI) will be greater than the cost. It is up to you to know what your worth is, to make sure the potential employer is clear on what that is, and to make sure that they pay you the best possible price for your contributions.

Action Step: Document 6-12 of your most impressive career achievements. Jot notes about the challenges and problems that you were facing, the actions you took to meet those challenges, and the results of those actions. Now quantify those results. Dollar figures or percentages of increase or decrease that represent dollar figures are often the most powerful way to present results. But, even if you don’t have dollar figures, there are often other quantifiable measures that you can use to express the value of your contributions and achievements in the workplace. Now, review all your success stories and practice until you have committed the details of each to memory and are comfortable discussing all aspects of them. These are the stories that you will use during your interviews with companies, to establish and illustrate your financial worth and your proven ability to deliver a strong ROI to your employers.

Salary Negotiations Tip #2: Wait until the right time to talk about salary with a potential employer. Wait until a job offer has already been made. When a potential employer brings up salary prior to a job offer, it is almost always for the purpose of screening you. Before the job offer, if you answer a salary-related question with an actual dollar amount and you give a figure lower than their range, believe it or not, you are likely to be screened out. Why? Because the employer may think that your low amount indicates that you are not capable of handling the responsibilities of the position. And sadly, even if you do make the cut and eventually win a job offer, your salary offer will be held down by the low-ball figure you mentioned too early in the process. If you mention a figure that is too high, you will also be screened out. At this early stage you have almost certainly not had the opportunity to establish your worth and value to the employer. So wait…postpone discussion of salary until you have a job offer.

Action Step: Think of ways that you might respond to questions about salary and practice saying them out loud until you are comfortable doing so. You’ll want to find your own natural words for this, but here is one suggestion for postponing when you are asked that inevitable question: “Salary? If I’m the right person for the job I’m confident that we can come to an agreement. Before we discuss salary, let’s make certain that I am the right person.” Or, “I’m sure you pay a fair salary, and I clearly understand that I need to make you more money than I cost, so I’m sure that when the time comes, we can come to a fair salary agreement.” You could soften either of these statements with a preface statement, such as “I’m very interested in this position and I’m a little concerned that a discussion of salary at this point could screen me out or box me in…”

Salary Negotiations Tip #3: When you are offered the job, and it is time to talk salary, let them talk first. If you have been offered the job and have now been asked about salary, just respond with a simple: “What range did you have in mind?” If you have accomplished what you set out to do and have clearly established your value and worth during the interview stages, you should have a fairly easy time getting the employer to state either a salary figure or range. Now, put a look of thoughtful consideration on your face, and restate the figure or the highest figure of the range with a question in your tone. In other words, say something like “Hmmm…$50,000…” – and then, just be quiet and look thoughtful.

Action Step: Prepare yourself mentally to be comfortable with silence. Know in advance that the silence is necessary and a key part of your negotiations. If you must, keep tally quietly in your head for a count of 30. The most likely outcome of your silence is that you will make the employer slightly nervous that they will lose you as an employee and all of the benefits that hiring you will bring them. Don’t be surprised if, in response to your silence and thoughtful stance, the employer proactively raises the offer before you even have a chance to say anything.

Salary Negotiations Tip #4: Be prepared with market research. With the Internet, you have numerous resources available to determine the salary ranges and all the related salary statistics for people who do the type of work you do in your geographic area. Use the resources available to you and be armed with the facts when you enter salary negotiations. The salaries that others are making are just one piece of the puzzle, but these statistics are an important piece of the puzzle. Having printed research from reliable sources that you can reference to support your desired salary during negotiations, and to help you realistically evaluate job offers that have been made to you, will be invaluable at this stage of the negotiation game.

Action Step: Go to the Internet now and Google “salary research.” Spend an hour or so researching, compiling, and printing salary research relevant to your situation. Be willing to pay for a comprehensive salary report. It will be money well spent and it will give you the ability to respond confidently to a job offer and associated salary offer with a researched response. If the offer made is just what you were hoping for or higher, go ahead and seal the deal. But, if it is a little low, you now have the researched knowledge to respond with a sincere “From my research, I estimate that positions like this for a person with my qualifications pay between X and Y. What can you do in that range?”

Salary Negotiations Tip #5: Remember that monetary compensation in the form of a salary is only part of the deal. What other benefits and perks might be important to you? Once you have come to an agreement with the employer on an actual salary figure, it is time to continue your negotiations to win an offer complete with the benefits that are most important to you.

Action Step: Take some time right now to think about the benefits that would be important to you. Take out a sheet of paper and list them so that you are prepared to discuss and negotiate them when the time comes. Examples may include sales commissions, performance bonuses, insurance, vacation time, a flexible work schedule, professional memberships, expenses for relocation, investment programs, use of a company car, special training or education benefits, and company discounts.